One task every father should do

Dividing up responsibilities between mother and father when our kids are young can be a daunting task.

But it turns out that there’s one duty I, as a father, should always take on, according to science, no less: the bedtime story.

Kids who are read to by dad, according to a study by Harvard University researchers, have better-developed language skills than kids who were read to by mom. So, if families have a choice—meaning the father is in the picture and present in the household—dad should take on the nightly bedtime story.

Let’s face it. Most dads interact with their kids differently than mothers and those differences can be hugely beneficial—dads roughhousing with kids, for example, helps children sync physical action and mental concentration and helps them learn to regulate themselves.

So Dads, let’s read to our kids!

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A wonderful life

One of the greatest Christmas movies of all time, It’s a Wonderful Life, highlights the life of an ordinary man, George Bailey, and paints of picture of what things would be like if he had never existed.  It completely changed his perspective.  If you’re a little down during this Christmas season, realize how much you mean to your wife, your children, your other family and friends and how much worse off they would be if you were not in the picture.  Your presence is truly their best present this Christmas.

Chore reminders

Do you find yourself constantly telling them to brush their teeth, make their bed or pick out their clothes for the next day? If you want to encourage responsibility in your child, consider posting a chart of their daily routines in their room. List your child’s name and their responsibilities for the day, then let them check off their completed tasks. You may even reward your child with a special treat if they complete everything that week.

Memory lane

We have been encouraging my father to collect old pictures and put captions on them to preserve our family memories. We want to share them with our kids and grandkids. What about you?

Well before you dig out your old yearbook and start telling “in the good old days” stories about yourself, change your course.  Get out videos and photos of your children when they were little.  Make it an event.  Pop some popcorn, gather everyone together and go back in time.  Pass around photos, watch those videos, and talk about the cute and special things your kids did when they were small.  If you can, focus on one child at a time and have a special viewing night for each.

Happy 4th of July!

On this Fourth of July, let’s go back to 1776. On that day, 56 men signed a document that would change the course of the world. It says, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. That they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

Those are the words of Thomas Jefferson. Do your children know the story behind the signing of the Declaration of Independence? Do you? Take a break from the fireworks and cookouts to talk with your kids about the people of the past who secured the freedom we enjoy today.